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Can anyone help this poor bush pilot out. I got the Dash 8 recently and knew enough to get her up and flying, it's a great flier, but knew I would have to read through everything so in I went. I am up to the extra downloadable tutorial written by some RW pilot, my eyes are burning, my brain is smoking and I have all the previous manuals leaking out of my ears. :D

 

Q; I see when to turn on the AC generators during the Captains originating checks but for the life of me can't find when to turn them off. 

 

I mostly understand everything about using external power or both that and the APU on standby generator+bleed and needing to turn the batteries off when on external power. I think I am also confused about how the power is being used because of how far down the check the AC generators go on. When the aircraft is first entered, lets say the external power and APU is off, everything is running off the batteries right? Then why would you at that point also have the DC generators switched on, what are they doing and where along the line does everything turn to AC power vs DC power. When your flying the batteries stay on although the bus tie(whatever that does) is turned off.

 

Any help for the layman is much appreciated. :)

 

Other than this I think this plane is pretty cool but it sure keeps you awful busy. What, Clearance is only giving me 20 minutes before taxi :huh: ....pause sim. ;)    

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Always gotta remember that in the RW you're only doing (roughly, but less than) half of the work. Except the walkaround - that's the first officer's job come rain or shine.

 

The workload is an issue I have with all simulations for the complex aircraft. I tried Voice Commander - on the PMDG 737. I don't think it's available yet for the Dash. It helps big time because the extra switching is being done for you. I don't use the voice part, just the "button" version. Works a treat.

 

Sorry I can't load and try the Dash for you with respect to your question. I'm pretty pressed for time as I'm out of here Saturday morning for a week. I'll take the Crapple with me so I can keep an eye on the MH shenanigans, but no flying. All I can say is that I've flown the Dash for a few hours. Probably been through that checklist five to ten times. I cannot recall there being a problem with power switching. Why do I think I'm starting on ground power, then switching to onboard at pushback? Been a month or so - memory is weak.

 

 

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Thanks for the input March. :)

 

Supposedly RW pilots, when using the ground power unit, switch all batteries off so there is no possibility of a short or to have a reverse draw due to a bad ground unit. Also they sometimes will, at the same time, run the APU and it's generator which will be on standby in case the external unit fails or if disconnected it will then engage automatically. The APU bleed air also helps on a hot day until ready for pushback and then at least one(right side) engine is started to use its built-in DC generator. The external unit can then be disconnected.

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I can't say for that specific AC, but on larger planes it's not uncommon to have rectifiers/inverters to make AC from DC and vice versa. Also, most, but not all of the AC stuff is typically more for creature comfort items and for some of the more esoteric avionics stuff (I think some of it still uses 400 Hz AC as well as the more common 60 Hz). Heavily loaded motors are more likely to be AC, particularly those that must be run continuously - intermittently operated motors are more likely to be DC.

 

Not sure of the relative capacities of the two kinds of generators on those aircraft, but suspect that the AC generators are probably the big dogs and carry all the AC load and also provide the bulk of the DC for normal flight operations through rectifiers. The DC generators, particularly from the APU are more likely sized for the cold and dark bootstrapping operations or for loads that are considered as backup or emergency items.

 

If I had to guess, and it would be a guess, I'd say the AC generators are probably tripped after the heavy electrical loads (e.g. electric-driven hydraulic pumps) are shut down or switched to ground power, not too long before the engines are shut down. I think the relays/breakers that transfer loads from on-board to ground power are break-before-make types so there is no concern about synchronization or cross-connecting.

 

The foregoing is mostly guesswork but not completely a stab in the dark either. I'm probably wrong on some of the points.

 

John

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:hat:To you Brett for getting that far into the Dash 80. I got it, looked at the manual and lost the will to live. I'm sure if I had more time I could get my head around it. In the meantime I'll stick to steam gauge classics, so much simpler.

 

I go far

With a VOR

And ADF

Is OK for Geoff

An FMC

Is not for me

And GPS

I couldn't care less

But old steam gauges

From bygone ages

Makes a pilot

Earn his wages

 

God I need a life. :D 

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Haha, love the poem. :D

 

I'm a GA flyer at heart and like the steam gauges better than the glass panels, even in smaller planes. With my small laptop they are easier to read at a glance, this planes glass panels actually are pretty readable on my rig so that's a plus. When I first got this aircraft I was blown away with the manuals and was thinking I would never be able to figure it all out.

 

On the other hand I do like a challenge, the Dash 8 manuals are pretty extensive but well written. Once you get through reading it all, the information on the procedures starts getting smaller because it is all repetitive.

 

In a nutshell you start with prepping the aircrafts switch positions, there are a lot but it is interesting to learn how an aircraft really works, start up is easy enough and only the taxi and descent seems like the busiest time. The FMS is the hardest, so far for me, but is kind of like learning how to set a new clock, press this than press that, press that then press this. It will come to me in time, it has some pretty cool features if only I could remember them. For the first time, I think I am going to print this stuff up for reference as I fly because it is a doozy of a plane.

 

You are already flying the default style passenger planes so already know most of the stuff, this just adds some switches for you to use. I recommend Froggles videos for a good look how easy it can be. Hang in there with it Geoff, if I can learn it over time, then it should be a breeze for you. :)    

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Thanks buddy, I will hang in there and get that baby in the air. At the moment I'm so busy with work that come the evening when I do my flying I'm too knac tired to wade through the manual. If you are getting into the heavier stuff I can recommend the Connie if you like slow and high. She's a sweetie. :thum:

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There's a guy in our flight sim club who used to re-possess airplanes for a living. He tells some pretty good stories, including filching a Mooney that was standing in a large puddle of engine oil. The mechanics at the FBO assured him it was not from that plane so he took it but flew to the next nearest airport and landed to get it checked out real soon. It turns out they were right - the Mooney was not leaking anything.

 

John

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........ I can recommend the Connie if you like slow and high. 

 

:D  :D  :D

 

If you your to tired to read the manuals then just fly it like ya stole it. ;)

 

                                                                                                                             u   p

I did a couple of circuits and bumps. The circuits were ok, the bumps were...  b  m  y. :(:D

                                                                                                                                 

 

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In the real world, there was a run of gear collapse incidents involving the Dash-8. It seems to have quieted down lately. I don't know if they made any modifications to prevent it or not.

John

 

Maybe they fired the inept pilots. :P

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In the real world, there was a run of gear collapse incidents involving the Dash-8. It seems to have quieted down lately. I don't know if they made any modifications to prevent it or not.

John

 

Maybe they fired the inept pilots. :P

 

Scandinavian, that had a fair share of those gear collapses on the Dash-8 took another route... the stopped flying with them  ;)

 

Here are a 2 out 3 spectacular landings that SAS suffered in a period of just 2 months

 

 

 

 

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I might be mistaken but it looked like in both video's that the pilots tried to land on the left wheels first, you can see the right wing come up both times. I wonder if the right side never locked into place, both vid's show the right side collapse.

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