Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hehe - you should try it. Just head west from Dodoma; you can't miss it. It fully bisects the lake and runs roughly NE-SW. I don't know exactly how far it goes, but it stretches at least to the horizon in both directions. The sides are not as sheer in the default though, due to the lower res mesh.

Oh, the lake isn't present in the default - I guess the water drained out!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 10: Chunya - Mbeya - Sumbawanga

ta024.jpg

HTCH - HTMB - HTSU

ta598.jpg

The direct route to Mbeya takes us over some pretty high mountains, even if they don't look it.

ta605.jpg

We're starting from 5000ft, and our destination is at 5500ft. With the mountains rising to 8000ft, we' take the easy way, and go around them.

ta617.jpg

Mbeya started off as a gold mining town in the 1920s.

ta622.jpg

The climate here is generally cool. Average rainfall is 900mm, with most of that between December and March. The abundant rainfall has led to extensive agriculture (but not in FS).

ta634.jpg

This area has been called the Scotland of Africa, because of the extensive bracken and heather covered hills. This is Lozlea Mountain.

ta640.jpg

Lake Rukwa is at an elevation of 2500ft. It is off the main rift system, rougly midway between lakes Malawi and Tanganyika. It is shallow, averaging just 3 - 5 metres deep.

ta647.jpg

This is also the Uwanda game Reserve, home to albino giraffes, strangely striped zebra, and the largest population of crocodiles in Tanzania.

ta656.jpg

Our destination for the night is Sumbawanga, just over the ridge. This town was referenced in Harry Potter as the home of the Sumbawanga Sunrays Quidditch team.

Postcards:

800px-Mbeya.jpg

Mbeya

lake_m1.jpg

Some of the hazards associated with a water landing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 11: Sumbawanga - Kalemie - Mpanda - Inyonga - Tabora

ta028.jpg

HTSU - FZRF - HTMP - HTIY - HTTB

A long leg today. We're going to cross Lake Tanganyika for a brief stop at Kalemie in DRC before heading back across into Tanzania.

ta661.jpg

Taking off from Sumbawanga

ta665.jpg

A lok back at Lake Rukwa

ta670.jpg

And our first glimpse of Lake tanganyika.

ta675.jpg

Lake tanganyika is the largest of the Rift Valley lakes. It's the world's longest freshwater lake, the second largest by volume. At 4,820ft it's the second deepest in the world, after Lake Baikal in Siberia.

ta678.jpg

Isn't Wikipedia great?

ta687.jpg

Gratuitous wide shot!

ta689.jpg

The Mahale Mountains are home to some of the last remaining wild Chimpanzees in Africa

ta696.jpg

Gratuitous tree shot, since we don't get many!

ta719.jpg

The first hint of bad weather in the distance.

ta725.jpg

The weather forms a clear boundary - thunder storms ahead; clear weather behind.

ta734.jpg

In the 19th Century, Tabora was a major centre for the slave trade.

ta744.jpg

This is one of the few larger airports, with a paved runway and traffic.

Postcards:

lake%2Btanganyika.jpg

Lake Tanganyika

The Tabora water project

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 12: Tabora - urambo - Uvinza - Kigoma - Kasulu

ta030.jpg

HTTB - HTUR - HTUV - HTKA - HTKU

We're heading back across the plateau to Lake Tanganyika, via a number of small strips.

ta750.jpg

Departing Tabora, we have to make almost a 180 degree turn from the runway, which means we should have a bit of a tailwind. Which is nice

ta758.jpg

We still have the thunder storms from yesterday. Unfortunately my screenshots never seem to catch them. Oh well!

ta763.jpg

The savannah is a bit greener here.

ta766.jpg

Turning final for another strip.

ta783.jpg

Approaching the lake. The airfield is at he far side of the town.

ta786.jpg

"Kigoma is surrounded by rugged mountains and forests that make it a pleasing and beautiful location."

ta788.jpg

Ahead of us is the Gombe Stream National Park, which streches to the border with the Congo. It was brought to the world's attention by the primatologist Jane Goodall, who studied chimpanzees here for many years. Just imagine those small patches of green are extensive tropical forests...

ta796.jpg

Heading into the hills for our final stop.

ta801.jpg

Postcards:

goodall-1.jpg

Jane Goodall

FEBRUARY%2B073.jpg

The road to kasulu

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 13: Kasulu to Bukoba

ta031.jpg

HTKU - HTBU

Today we reach lake Victoria.

ta807.jpg

Departing kasulu

ta811.jpg

Our route takes us close to the borders with Barundi and Rwanda. This is the flood plain of the Malagalasi-Moyowosi wetland area.

ta815.jpg

Our first glimpse of Lake Victoria.

ta822.jpg

Victoria is, of course the largest lake by area in Africa, and the second largest in the world (to Lake Superior in North America).

ta833.jpg

Turning final at Bukoba. You really don't want to overshoot the runway here, since it goes right to the shore line.

ta837.jpg

This is the most northerly point on our safari, ad we are just one degree south of the equator.

Postcards:

8430084.jpg

bukoba-airport.jpg

3192483794_7208e99882.jpg

Bukoba airfield

Link to post
Share on other sites

day 14: Bukoba - Musoma - Nansio - Mwanza

ta034.jpg

HTBU - HTMU - HTUK - HTMW

We're crossing Lake Victoria today.

ta859.jpg

taking off from Bukoba

ta864.jpg

The island that we saw offshore in the photo at the end of last time, does exist in FS, it just doesn't seem to have any elevation data.

ta867.jpg

There are a couple of mesh holes in the lake!

ta876.jpg

ta881.jpg

Approaching Musoma. This is a small fishing village on the eastern shore.

ta886.jpg

Turning final. The default airport disappears into the lake at its northern end.

ta891.jpg

Despite being a dirt and grass strip, Dash-8s regularly land here. The road really shouldn't cross the runway (it is actually between the airport and the lake shore), but as it is, you'd better keep a good liik out for traffic crossing!

ta902.jpg

Heading South to our next stop at Nansio. This small town is a port of entry for water based traffic.

ta909.jpg

Nansio is on the island of Ukerewe, which is the largest island in Lake Victoria.

ta913.jpg

Fortunately we have turbine power, and the holes don't bother us overly much!

ta919.jpg

And so onto Mwanza, our final stop for the day. Mwanza is actually the second largest city in Tanzania, and growing rapidly, thanks to its staples of mining, tourism and fishing. Its airport is International, with scheduled services to Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, Entebbe and Kilimanjaro.

Postcards:

800px-Musoma_Seeufer.jpg

The lake shore at Musoma

4.jpg

and the airport

139811313_0cc6df9c75.jpg

Mwanza

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 15: Mwanza - Ibadakuli - Mwadui - Maswa - Seronera

ta035.jpg

HTMW - HTSY - HTMD - HTMC - HTSN

Welcome to Serengeti National Park!

ta924.jpg

Departing Mwanza. Mwanza has a total population of around 2 million, with 1.2 million living in the city itself.

ta927.jpg

The airport is served by Air Tanzania, Auric Air, Precision Air, Jetlink Express and Fly540.

ta932.jpg

Ibadakuli village is strangely square in FS!

ta937.jpg

Mwadui was the first diamond mine of any significance outside South Africa. It has been in continuous operation since 1940, and its open cast pit is now over 300ft deep.

ta968.jpg

Serengeti means 'endless plains' in the Maasai language. It's famous for its massive annual migrations of wildebeeste to and from the Maasai Mara reserve in Kenya. I'm sure everyone has seen the film of wildebeeste crossing the Mara river.

ta976.jpg

Seronera is in the heart of the Serengeti, at the edge of the Ngorongoro uplands.

Postcards:

This image is available as a wallpaper from www.kewlwallpapers.com (I've left it as a link cos it won't show as a thumbnail. But it's on my desktop! :cool:)

serengeti_national_park.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwX5-N8PUCM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 16: Seronera - Lake Manyara - Arusha

ta036.jpg

HTSN - HTLM - HTAR

Our trip across the Serengeti takes us through some of Africa's most famous landscapes, including the Ngogongoro crater, Lake Manyara and Mt Meru.

ta992.jpg

Departing Seronera.

ta999.jpg

Ahead of us we can see the Ngorongoro Crater rising from the plains

ta1004.jpg

The Ngorongoro crater is an unbroken, unflooded volcanic caldera. It is some 2000ft deep, and the crater floor covers some 100 square miles.

ta1009.jpg

The crater was formed around 3 million years ago, when its volcano exploded. It's estimated that the original volcano was some 19,000ft high. (roughly the same size as Kilimanjaro).

ta1015.jpg

Lake Magdi is the main source of water within the crater, and is seasonal.

ta1020.jpg

Ngorongoro is particularly famous for its large inbred lions, and herds of grazing wildlife documentary makers. It is well known as home to the "Big 5" - BBC, ITV, Discovery, Hallmark & Nat Geo.

ta1036.jpg

The Eastern wall descends all the way to Lake Manyara.

ta1045.jpg

Hemingway described this as the most beautiful lake in Africa.

ta1056.jpg

ta1062.jpg

ta1067.jpg

The Losiminguri Forest Reserve

ta1071.jpg

ta1078.jpg

Arusha lies at the foot of Mt Meru, which is an active volcano. The city is home to 1.2 million people.

Postcards:

900px-Ngorongoro_Crater_Panorama.jpg

Ngorongoro Crater Panorama

800px-Overlook_of_Lake_Manyara_National_Park.JPG

Lake Manyara, from almost the same vantage point as the screenshot

020826.jpg

Need traffic? We gots traffic!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 17: Arusha - West Kilimanjaro - Moshi - Kilimanjaro Intl

ta037.jpg

HTAR - HTWK - HTMS - HTKJ

Mt Kilimanjaro. Need I say more?

ta006.jpg

Departing Arusha, in the shadow of Mt Meru.

ta018.jpg

Although it is onlt the 10th highest peak in Tanzania, this volcano still outclimbs us!

ta020.jpg

Mt meru is a stratovolcano. It blew out its eastern side in much the same way as Mt St. Helens in the US.

ta038.jpg

At west Kilimanjaro, we find a mast. This is one of the few objects in the Objects pack.

ta059.jpg

Unfortunately, the OpenVFR landclass has removed all traces of snow from the summit. Now, the snow cap on the summit is largely seasonal - it grows and shrinks, although it never completely disappears. This shrinkage is through wind erosion and sublimation; it has nothing to do with 'global warming', since temperatures never get above freezing, so the ice never melts. The snow is replenished from rain during the wet season.

ta068.jpg

It took us a lot of effort to get here! We're going to attempt a landing at 19,000ft...

ta074.jpg

Ok, that wasn't pretty. There's not enough room on the summit to take off again, so we just kinda fall off the edge!

ta080.jpg

Your task, should you choose to accept it, is to glide from the top of the volcano, and land on the runway at Moshi. *Without using any power*

ta093.jpg

I did it. Can you?

Postcard:

kilimanjaro.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 18: Kilimanjaro - Same - Mombo - Tanga

ta038.jpg

HTKJ - HTSE - HTMO - HTTG

ta117.jpg

Leaving Kilimanjaro

ta125.jpg

Water drains off the slopes of Kilimanjaro into the Nyumba ya Mungu Reservoir. A hydroelectric scheme provides power for the region.

ta132.jpg

The Usambaras mountain ranges follow the Tanzania-Kenya border pretty much all the way to the coast

ta141.jpg

You can still make out Kilimanjaro in the distance behind us. Of course, we're following the road, but we also have the Tanga Line railway for company. This line currently goes to Arusha, but there are pland to extend it all the way into Uganda, and beyond.

ta146.jpg

The East Usambaras are covered in tropical rainforest.

ta159.jpg

The cultivated plains heading into Tanga.

ta165.jpg

Tanga is a small city on the Indian Ocean coast. It is very close to the border with Kenya.

ta168.jpg

This city gave its name to Tanganyika, the territory that joined with Zanzibar to become Tanzania.

Postcard:

trek_tanzania_usambara_main_viewpoint.jpg

Usambara

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day 19: Tanga - Chake Chake - Kisauni - Dar es Salaam

ta040.jpg

HTTG-HTPE-HTZA-HTDA

For our final leg in this safari, we are going to tour through the spice islands of Zanzibar.

ta173.jpg

Leaving Tanga

ta176.jpg

Heading out into the Indian Ocean

ta180.jpg

Pemba is the first of the Spice Islands, and well known for its plantations of cloves. In fact, over 70% of the world's cloves come from here, as well as cinnamon, nutmeg and pepper.

ta181.jpg

The Zanzibar archipelago comprises two main islands, pemba and Unguja, plus many

smaller islands.

ta186.jpg

Chake Chake is the island's principal town.

ta196.jpg

Unguja Island (also known as Zanzibar) is the biggest island in the archipelago.

ta209.jpg

In 1890, Britain traded Germany Heligoland in exchange for Zanzibar and other territories. This was to have dire consequences in the later war years, as Heligoland was key to controlling the German Bight. Zanzibar joined with Tanganyika in the 1960s to become Tanzania.

ta214.jpg

Final for Zanzibar's airport.

ta220.jpg

The channel between Zanzibar and the mainland just 22.5 miles across at its narrowest.

ta225.jpg

We're heading to Dar es Salaam, the cultural centre of Tanzania.

ta228.jpg

The Msasani Peninsula is where all the diplomats and embassy staff live, in walled compounds.

ta252.jpg

The airport is named after Julius Nyerere, the country's first president.

ta259.jpg

And so we land, with the last rays of the sun. there's just time to hand the keys back before heading off to the bar.

We've had a long trip, just over 3500 nautical miles, and some 32 hours flight time. I hope you've enjoyed it and discovered a few interesting things along the way. Until next time, here are a couple of final postcards:

Postcards

Pemba_island,_Tanzania._View_from_Chake_Chake_town_center_over_the_mangroves_towards_the_sea.JPG

Chake Chake bay

zanzibaradventure.jpg

Zanzibar

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bravo Tim :clapping:

A stunning sunset on what was a great adventure.

I certainly learnt a few things about the region.

Thanks for sticking with it and think of all those air miles you could have won!

Cheers,

Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All

Always interested in a good flight ...

Flew you Flight Plan #17 Arusha to Kilimanjaro and return to HTKJ.

I only had default FSX scenery but that might be good for a comparison.

Here are some pics for easy viewing.

10-002.jpg

10-005.jpg

10-013copy.jpg

10-016.jpg

10-024.jpg

10-029.jpg

For Information only: The flight plan loaded fine in Plan G and was okay in FSX the first few waypoints then it took off to who knows where. Will check it to see if I can find the problem...

Thanks Tim A. for the Flight Plans and look for future routes in the soon.

Sim Buddy,

Gunk/Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim and gunk,

 

You guys have inspired me to make airport diagrams for all the airports in the Tanzania Safari. I got a good start tonight and have created and posted the first three in support of this adventure. These are uploaded to the Download Centre (that always sounds wrong)...

 

  • HTKJ Kilimanjaro Intl - Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
  • HTAR Arusha - Arusha, Tanzania
  • HTTG Tanga - Tanga, Tanzania

 

I have quite a long list of the rest and will be working through them at whatever pace I can manage. Most will be relatively non-complex and I'm hoping to bang them out fairly quickly. Mutley's Hangar may end up with the best set of Tanzanian airport charts this side of Arusha.

 

I finally got around to looking at the review tonight after seeing gunk's posting and I have to say, that's a very well crafted piece of work, with the best explanation of meshes, landclasses, objects, etc that I've ever seen in print. Not too shabby. I passed it by originally because neither FSX nor Tanzania cause me to hyperventilate, but happy I went back for a look.

 

John

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It took a while but I have created and uploaded airport diagrams for all FIFTY-ONE :icon_yikes: of the airports that are listed in Tim's flight plans for the Tanzanian Safari. Many are just waypoints but they are diagrammed and available for your download anyway if you choose to use them. Check out the Africa section of Airport Diagrams in the MH Downoad Centre.

 

This is obviously the land of primitive airports. Fuel pumps, NDBs and paved runways are few and far between, as are control towers, taxiways, paved ramps or airport buildings of any kind. I think there was only one ILS in the bunch. Many had no published radio frequencies. I used FSX as a source for all but one, but they should be more than adequate for use in FS9 as well. I suspect that there is little difference in the details.

 

Anyway, the supporting charts are there if you choose to fly Tim's adventure, with or without the software he reviewed. It gave me an excuse to add some numbers to the Africa section of the Download Centre, which was pretty sparse before this. I'll be happy to get back to doing some civilized airports, however. There's a rally coming up in Colombia, so maybe that will be the next project. See you there...

 

John

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I love the concept of this. Tanzania is a country I know pretty well as spent quite a bit of time there. In Dar es Sallm there is a great seamans mission with a rooftop dining area and a dance floor underneath! Its a big city and has a very impressive harbour.I also met a couple of very obliging girls when I was there and spent several days at their village a few miles inland! (enough said about that but use your own imagination! My excuse was I,d been at sea for 4 months!)

Mtwara though is interesting, The harbour itself is quite small and our 27,000 ton tanker took up two of the 4 jetty spaces. there is not much to see on the quayside but the road leads into the town a mile or so inland, this road in the summmer is lined with bushes and undergrowth and inhabited by Dragonflies the size of 747s ! the town looked like a frontier town from an old western movie. The bar still had hitching rails out the front, though these days it was old ex army trucks parked outside rather than horses. BP had a small refinery just behind the town hence the reason for our visit. the harbour itself is quite deep anmd has some lovely corals on the botttom. We went scuba diving whilst there and recovered some for the ships bar. It was whilst doing this that I nearly drowned! I was up by the jetty wall having a breather, I,d stuck my hand into a cleft in the concrete to hang on and taken my mask off. From the cleft an enormous spider emerged (about the size of a dinner plate!) and ranovermy hand and arm before scuttling up the jetty wall ! I was so shocked i fell into the water without my mask on! It took two crewmen to pull me out! We also "rescued" the propellor from a tanzanian navy Gunboat that came into the harbour. the crew all went ashore and we wanted a trophy for the ships bar! Another hazard to watch out for are the Fish Eagls that go after the waste bins on the ships stern. They are big beggars and quite a sight. All in all Mtwara was an enchanting place though and one I,d love to visit again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...